Sunday, May 19, 2019

Why the Guardian is changing the language it uses about the environment | Environment | The Guardian

The Guardian has updated its style guide to introduce terms that more accurately describe the environmental crises facing the world.

Instead of “climate change” the preferred terms are “climate emergency, crisis or breakdown” and “global heating” is favoured over “global warming”, although the original terms are not banned.

“We want to ensure that we are being scientifically precise, while also communicating clearly with readers on this very important issue,” said the editor-in-chief, Katharine Viner. “The phrase ‘climate change’, for example, sounds rather passive and gentle when what scientists are talking about is a catastrophe for humanity.”

“Increasingly, climate scientists and organisations from the UN to the Met Office are changing their terminology, and using stronger language to describe the situation we’re in,” she said.

Melting Arctic ice forces animals to search for food on land, such as these polar bears in northern Russia.
The destruction of Arctic ecosystems forces animals to search for food on land, such as these polar bears in northern Russia. Photograph: Alexander Grir/AFP/Getty Images

Continue reading at: Why the Guardian is changing the language it uses about the environment | Environment | The Guardian

Our Communities, Our Power: Advancing Resistance and Resilience in Climate Change Adaptation Toolkit | CAKE: Climate Adaptation Knowledge Exchange

The Beloved Community is a vision for our future where all people share equally in the wealth and bounty of the earth, where we protect its abundance, diversity and beauty for future generations. In this vision of liberation, racism, exploitation, and domination are replaced by democracy, cooperation, interdependence, and love. To get there, we pursue transformative, systems-change solutions. What do we mean by this? The root causes of the problems our communities face—like climate change, racism, and economic inequality—are all deeply connected. Since the problems are connected, so are the solutions.

Our Communities, Our Power: Advancing Resistance and Resilience in Climate Change Adaptation Toolkit | CAKE: Climate Adaptation Knowledge Exchange

Saturday, May 18, 2019

Levin introduces bill to end sales of gasoline-powered cars in US by 2040

Zero-emission vehicles, or ZEVs, may make up less than 2 percent of the nation’s car sales but a bill introduced on Capitol Hill by Rep. Mike Levin, D-San Juan Capistrano, would require half of all sales of new passenger vehicles in 2030 be ZEVs, with the mandate ramping up 5 percent per year to 100 percent by 2040 — essentially eliminating the sale of gasoline-powered passenger cars in the U.S. in little more than 20 years.

Friday, May 17, 2019

CO2 levels: Carbon dioxide hit the highest level in human history - The Washington Post

When will we ever learn...



Over the weekend, the climate system sounded simultaneous alarms. Near the entrance to the Arctic Ocean in northwest Russia, the temperature surged to 84 degrees Fahrenheit (29 Celsius). Meanwhile, the concentration of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere eclipsed 415 parts per million for the first time in human history.



CO2 levels: Carbon dioxide hit the highest level in human history - The Washington Post

Monday, May 13, 2019

Polluter-pay law introduced in Michigan legislature | Michigan Radio

Michigan lawmakers introduced new bills designed to make polluters pay. It requires that the polluter clean up the pollutant as much as technically possible. Democrats Senator Jeff Irwin and Representative Yousef Rabhi introduced identical bills in the House and Senate Thursday. Irwin says there was a polluter-pay law, but the Engler administration changed them in 1995.

Polluter-pay law introduced in Michigan legislature | Michigan Radio

Microplastics are blowing in the wind | Science News for Students

Not just in the oceans...



A new study offers the first proof that microplastics are traveling long distances by air. These tiny bits of plastic were found raining down in remote places at rates that rival what’s seen in large cities — some 365 bits of plastic trash per square meter (10.7 square feet) per day. Clearly, one author concludes, this “invisible pollution is transporting its way around the world.”

a photo of the Pyrenees mountains in Europe

This part of the Pyrenees mountains in Europe looks remote and clean. But tiny bits of plastic fall here every day, scientists are finding.G. LE ROUX

Continue reading at: Microplastics are blowing in the wind | Science News for Students

Sunday, May 12, 2019

Saving Ecosystems to Protect the Climate, and Vice Versa: a Global Deal for Nature | InsideClimate News

The Global Deal for Nature (GDN) is a time-bound, science-driven plan to save the diversity and abundance of life on Earth. Pairing the GDN and the Paris Climate Agreement would avoid catastrophic climate change, conserve species, and secure essential ecosystem services. New findings give urgency to this union: Less than half of the terrestrial realm is intact, yet conserving all native ecosystems—coupled with energy transition measures—will be required to remain below a 1.5°C rise in average global temperature.

The Arctic tundra is among several key ecosystems that store large amounts of carbon, keeping it out of the atmosphere, but are under increasing pressure as global temperatures rise. Credit: Dave Walsh/VW Pics/UIG via Getty Images
The Arctic tundra is among several key ecosystems that store large amounts of carbon, keeping it out of the atmosphere, but that are under increasing pressure as global temperatures rise. Credit: Dave Walsh/VW Pics/UIG via Getty Images

Continue reading at: Saving Ecosystems to Protect the Climate, and Vice Versa: a Global Deal for Nature | InsideClimate News

Free full-text paper in Science: https://advances.sciencemag.org/content/5/4/eaaw2869

Here are 5 ways people are speeding up the extinction of species | Science News

Common sense but where is common sense today?

Stories about individual species on the brink of extinction may be all too familiar. But a new tally now reveals the breadth of the conservation crisis: One million of the world’s species are now poised to vanish, some as soon as within the next few decades.

golden toad
GONE GOLD  The last recorded sighting of the golden toad Incilius periglenes, once abundant in the cloud forests of Central America, was on May 15, 1989.

That number, which amounts to 1 in every 8 animal or plant species on Earth, comes from a sweeping new analysis of about 15,000 studies conducted within the last 50 years on topics ranging from biodiversity to climate to the health of ecosystems. During that time, the human population has doubled, increasing from 3.7 billion in 1970 to 7.6 billion today. And people are behind the looming losses, an international group of scientists says.

Continue reading at: Here are 5 ways people are speeding up the extinction of species | Science News

Political will to fight climate change is fading, warns UN chief - BBC News

Avengers - The Endgame. Maybe it is time for humanity to focus on the real endgame and end the oblivion and distractions - or disappear from the planet...
Political will to fight climate change is fading, warns UN chief - BBC News

Thursday, May 9, 2019

What Losing 1 Million Species Means for the Planet — and Humanity • The Revelator

A new UN report finds that at least 1 million species are at risk of extinction. Will this finally be enough to motivate worldwide action?
The United Nations this week released a powerful report on the state of nature around the planet. Among its disheartening conclusions, the report — by hundreds of experts from 50 countries — estimates that a staggering 1 million species are at risk of extinction in the next few decades due to human-related causes.
Continue reading at: What Losing 1 Million Species Means for the Planet — and Humanity • The Revelator

Saturday, May 4, 2019

Friday, May 3, 2019

Food safety: Dung beetles and soil bacteria reduce risk of human pathogens -- ScienceDaily

Food safety regulations increasingly pressure growers to remove hedgerows, ponds and other natural habitats from farms to keep out pathogen-carrying wildlife and livestock. Yet, this could come at the cost of biodiversity. New research encourages the presence of dung beetles and soil bacteria at farms as they naturally suppress E. coli and other harmful pathogens before spreading to humans.

Continue reading at: Food safety: Dung beetles and soil bacteria reduce risk of human pathogens -- ScienceDaily

Thursday, May 2, 2019

UK Parliament declares climate change emergency - BBC News

This is leadership needed from every government!



MPs have approved a motion to declare an environment and climate emergency.

This proposal, which demonstrates the will of the Commons on the issue but does not legally compel the government to act, was approved without a vote.

Climate protesters in Westminster

Continue reading at: UK Parliament declares climate change emergency - BBC News

Wednesday, May 1, 2019

PFAS found in Saline during investigation across River Raisin watershed - mlive.com

Michigan officials are investigating PFAS contamination in a second watershed that feeds into Lake Erie.

The chemicals were found last summer in Saline, southwest of Ann Arbor, where the city’s wastewater treatment plant was discharging them to a tributary of the River Raisin.

That’s also near a contaminated industrial site, located just steps from the Saline River, that has even higher levels of the unsafe chemicals in groundwater- and they’re possibly moving into the river, officials say.

Continue reading at: PFAS found in Saline during investigation across River Raisin watershed - mlive.com

WHO: New report calls for urgent action to avert antimicrobial resistance crisis

CAFOS such as the ones we have in Lenawee County are one big culprit for this danger!

International organizations unite on critical recommendations to combat drug-resistant infections and prevent staggering number of deaths each year

29 April 2019 Joint News Release  New York

UN, international agencies and experts today released a groundbreaking report demanding immediate, coordinated and ambitious action to avert a potentially disastrous drug-resistance crisis.

If no action is taken - warns the UN Ad hoc Interagency Coordinating Group on Antimicrobial Resistance who released the report – drug-resistant diseases could cause 10 million deaths each year by 2050 and damage to the economy as catastrophic as the 2008-2009 global financial crisis. By 2030, antimicrobial resistance could force up to 24 million people into extreme poverty.



Continue reading at: New report calls for urgent action to avert antimicrobial resistance crisis

Monday, April 29, 2019

2019 COTE® Top Ten Awards - AIA - Setting the standard in design and sustainability

The 2019 COTE® Top Ten program highlights projects that meet the AIA Committee on the Environment's rigorous criteria for social, economic, and ecological value. The COTE® Top Ten Plus designation denotes projects with exemplary performance data and post occupancy lessons.

COTE Frick1 Massery

2019 COTE® Top Ten Awards - AIA

Monday, April 22, 2019

Extinction Rebellion arrests pass 1,000 on eighth day of protests | Environment | The Guardian

‘Die-in’ staged at Natural History Museum as protesters gather at legal site in Marble Arch

More than 1,000 people have been arrested at Extinction Rebellion climate protests in London, police have said, in what organisers described as the biggest civil disobedience event in recent British history.

The Metropolitan police said that as of 10am on Monday, 1,065 arrests had been made and 53 people charged in relation to the protests.

Activists at Natural History Museum
Extinction Rebellion activists at the Natural History Museum. Photograph: Tolga Akmen/AFP/Getty Images

Read more at: Extinction Rebellion arrests pass 1,000 on eighth day of protests | Environment | The Guardian

Saturday, April 20, 2019

‘I’m Just More Afraid of Climate Change Than I Am of Prison’ - The New York Times

‘I’m Just More Afraid of Climate Change Than I Am of Prison’

How a group of five activists called the Valve Turners decided to fight global warming by doing whatever it takes.



On Oct. 11, 2016, Michael Foster and two companions rose before dawn, left their budget hotel in Grand Forks, N.D., and drove a white rental sedan toward the Canadian border, diligently minding the speed limit. The day was cold and overcast, and Foster, his diminutive frame wrapped in a down jacket, had prepared for a morning outdoors. As the driver, Sam Jessup, followed a succession of laser-straight farm roads through the sugar-beet fields, and a documentary filmmaker, Deia Schlosberg, recorded events from the back seat, Foster sat hunched in the passenger seat, mentally rehearsing his plan.

Continue reading at: ‘I’m Just More Afraid of Climate Change Than I Am of Prison’ - The New York Times

Wednesday, April 17, 2019

What if we could actually build a better world?

With a Green New Deal, Here’s What the World Could Look Like for the Next Generation

IT’S THE SPRING of 2043, and Gina is graduating college with the rest of her class. She had a relatively stable childhood. Her parents availed themselves of some of the year of paid family leave they were entitled to, and after that she was dropped off at a free child care program.

Pre-K and K-12 were also free, of course, but so was her time at college, which she began after a year of public service, during which she spent six months restoring wetlands and another six volunteering at a day care much like the one she had gone to.

Countless wind turbines at the San Gorgonio Pass Wind Farm delivering 615 MW, in September 2017. | usage worldwide Photo by: Frank Duenzl/picture-alliance/dpa/AP Images
Wind turbines at the San Gorgonio Pass Wind Farm in Riverside County, Calif., in September 2017. Photo: Frank Duenzl/picture-alliance/dpa/AP

With a Green New Deal, Here’s What the World Could Look Like for the Next Generation

Monday, April 15, 2019

City of Chicago :: 100% Renewable Energy by 2040

Chicago committed to become 100% renewable for all municipal buildings by 2025. When will Adrian follow?
Actually by 2040: https://www.ecowatch.com/chicago-renewable-energy-2634313016.html

Chicago Renewable Energy Challenge

City of Chicago :: Chicago Renewable Energy Challenge Program

Last Documentary this Wednesday: Environmental Documentaries - SHU Sustainability

Last feature of the Environmental Documentary Series this semester is "Tomorrow" - original title: "Demain". In this 120 minute feature, the authors collect promising strategies for a desirable and livable future in several key areas. It is a very optimistic film showing ways out of our current crisis: https://www.demain-lefilm.com/en/film







Environmental Documentaries - SHU Sustainability

Thursday, April 4, 2019

Carbon Neutral Cities Alliance

The Carbon Neutral Cities Alliance (CNCA) is a collaboration of leading global cities working to cut greenhouse gas emissions by 80-100% by 2050 or sooner — the most aggressive GHG reduction targets undertaken anywhere by any city.

Cities – CNCA

Tuesday, April 2, 2019

Environmental Documentary Series is Showing: The Reluctant Radical

Showing this Wednesday at the 7th Environmental Documentary Series

Info about place and time: http://sustainability.sienaheights.edu/environmental-documentaries.html

If a crime is committed in order to prevent a greater crime, is it forgivable? Is it, in fact, necessary?

THE RELUCTANT RADICAL follows activist Ken Ward as he confronts his fears and puts himself in the direct path of the fossil fuel industry to combat climate change. Ken breaks the law as a last resort, to fulfill what he sees as his personal obligation to future generations. After twenty years leading environmental organizations, Ken became increasingly alarmed by both the scientific evidence of climate change and the repercussions for civilization as we know it. Ken pushed for a crisis level response from inside environmental organizations. Those efforts failed, and he now embraces direct action civil disobedience as the most effective political tool to deal with catastrophic circumstances.

reluctant-radical

Wednesday, March 27, 2019

NASA Sea Level Change Portal

NASA keeps track of sea level change and its causes from space. Find out more about how NASA satellite observations help our understanding of this complex topic.



NASA Sea Level Change Portal

Wednesday, March 20, 2019

TONIGHT: Dirt Rich - The Movie

http://sustainability.sienaheights.edu/environmental-documentaries.html

Today, 20-Mar, showing Dirt Rich, 88 minutes

Topics: Food, Climate Change, Solutions

Dirt Rich shifts focus from greenhouse gas emissions to carbon draw down which is the only viable solution for reversing the effects of runaway global warming in a timely manner. Through exploration of geo-therapy strategies, Dirt Rich shines light on their value and beauty which undeniably are our last hope for protecting life as we know it on this challenged planet. Through regenerative agricultural practices, reforestation of abandoned land, protection/restoration of carbon rich wetlands and keystone species, Dirt Rich illustrates how implementing these strategies will return our atmosphere to safe levels of carbon while growing soil, our most precious resource.

Dirt Rich - The Movie

Saturday, March 16, 2019

Game Changer Fund – CNCA

Cities have limited access to early-stage risk capital for implementing some of the riskier strategies for decarbonizing key systems at a scale considered “transformational.” In response, the Carbon Neutral Cities Alliance (CNCA) created a new “Game Changer Fund” in 2018 to foster even greater capacity within CNCA and other cities to implement critical, groundbreaking work that advances the global field of deep urban decarbonization. The Game Changers Report, released below, highlights seven transformations occurring across our CNCA cities.

Game Changer Fund – CNCA

UN: Environment is deadly, worsening mess, but not hopeless

Earth is sick with multiple and worsening environmental ills killing millions of people yearly, a new U.N. report says.

Climate change, a global major extinction of animals and plants, a human population soaring toward 10 billion, degraded land, polluted air, and plastics, pesticides and hormone-changing chemicals in the water are making the planet an increasing unhealthy place for people, says the scientific report issued once every few years.



UN: Environment is deadly, worsening mess, but not hopeless

Dynamic flood modeling essential to assess the coastal impacts of climate change | Scientific Reports

Coastal inundation due to sea level rise (SLR) is projected to displace hundreds of millions of people worldwide over the next century, creating significant economic, humanitarian, and national-security challenges.

Figure 1

Dynamic flood modeling essential to assess the coastal impacts of climate change | Scientific Reports

Resource extraction responsible for half world’s carbon emissions | Environment | The Guardian

Extractive industries are responsible for half of the world’s carbon emissions and more than 80% of biodiversity loss, according to the most comprehensive environmental tally undertaken of mining and farming.

 MaMassive dump trucks by the Syncrude upgrader plant, Canada. The tar sands are the largest industrial project on the planet, and the world’s most environmentally destructive. Photograph: Rex/Shutterstock
Resource extraction responsible for half world’s carbon emissions | Environment | The Guardian

Friday, March 15, 2019

Mapped: How climate change affects extreme weather around the world

This is just the beginning and it will increase and last for at least 100 years if we do not turn the wheels NOW...

A valuable map developed by Carbon Brief detailing extreme weather events around the world and to what extent it can be attributed to climate change.



Mapped: How climate change affects extreme weather around the world

Wednesday, March 13, 2019

Mapping the Coal Ash Contamination | Earthjustice

The industry's own data show the tip of the iceberg. Another toxic time bomb, especially in the light of more erratic weather extremes...

Groundwater monitoring data is publicly available for 773 coal ash sites across the United States and Puerto Rico, and according to a recent report analyzed and released by Earthjustice and the Environmental Integrity Project, almost all of them are contaminating groundwater with unsafe levels of toxic pollutants.

Mapping the Coal Ash Contamination | Earthjustice

Sunday, March 10, 2019

Citizen Science During the Flint, Michigan Federal Water Emergency: Ethical Dilemmas and Lessons Learned

A citizen science collaboration between Flint residents, the Virginia Tech “Flint Water Study” team, and others helped to uncover the Flint Lead-in-Drinking Water Crisis and a community-wide outbreak of Legionella. The resulting Federal Emergency declaration in January 2016 resulted in more than $600 million in relief funding, an acknowledged case of environmental injustice, and resignations/indictments of some public officials. But after responsible government entities apologized and attempted to make amends and help with the recovery, some “citizen scientists” began making public statements that were in direct conflict with public health messaging of scientific authorities. A general state of science anarchy resulted, which created further distrust and confusion.



Citizen Science During the Flint, Michigan Federal Water Emergency: Ethical Dilemmas and Lessons Learned

Tuesday, March 5, 2019

US airlines have an abysmal carbon footprint - Vox

Air travel is surging. That’s a huge problem for the climate.

Greenhouse gas emissions in the United States appear to be on the rise again after years of decline. The Rhodium Group recently released preliminary estimates showing carbon dioxide emissions overall surged 3.4 percent in 2018, with the transportation sector leading the way as the largest source of emissions for the third year in a row.


Greenhouse gas emissions from air travel increased in 2018 and are poised to surge in the coming decades. Silas Stein/picture alliance/Getty Image

US airlines have an abysmal carbon footprint - Vox

Friday, March 1, 2019

Earth's fish are disappearing because of climate change, study says - CNN

Climate change is endangering fish worldwide, shrinking populations by up to 35% in coastal regions near China and Japan, scientists say.



Ocean warming has led to a 4% global decline in sustainable catches, the greatest amount of fish that can be caught without depleting stocks long-term, according to a study published Thursday in the journal Science.

Using global data on fisheries and ocean temperature maps, scientists from Rutgers University in New Jersey analyzed changes in sustainable catches triggered by temperature rises between 1930 and 2010.

The scientists said they were "stunned" to discover that global warming has significantly affected fish stocks worldwide and warned that the decline could threaten the livelihoods and food supplies of millions of people.

Fishermen gather to harvest fish in Hangzhou in eastern China.

Earth's fish are disappearing because of climate change, study says - CNN

Monday, February 25, 2019

A Growing Majority of Americans Think Global Warming is Happening and are Worried - Yale Program on Climate Change Communication

FYI. Not where public opinion should be and far away from other countries but it is getting better…

Data from our Climate Change in the American Mind surveys show that, over the past five years, the proportion of Americans who think global warming is happening and who worry about it has increased sharply. During this time, Americans have become increasingly convinced that global warming is happening (+11 percentage points), is human-caused (+15), and that most scientists agree it is happening (+15). The proportion of Americans who say they have personally experienced the effects of global warming has also increased (+13).

A Growing Majority of Americans Think Global Warming is Happening and are Worried

A Growing Majority of Americans Think Global Warming is Happening and are Worried - Yale Program on Climate Change Communication

Friday, February 22, 2019

Warmer world + more hungry people = BIG challenges » Yale Climate Connections

Feed the world and reduce the climate crisis? Yes, it is possible.

Feeding the world’s rapidly expanding population – currently at 7.6 billion and expected to reach 9.8 billion by 2050 – without exacerbating climate change will require the closing of three significant gaps, according to a new report, “Creating a Sustainable Food Future.”
The gaps highlighted in a recent World Resources Institute (WRI) report involve:
food supply, simply producing enough to meet rising demand;
land for food production: The report estimates that if current production rates continue with the same yields, an additional area almost twice the size of India would be required to produce enough food; and
mitigating increased greenhouse gas emissions likely to be produced by the additional food production needed by 2050.

Wheat and silos

Warmer world + more hungry people = BIG challenges » Yale Climate Connections

World's food supply under 'severe threat' from loss of biodiversity

Plants, insects and organisms crucial to food production in steep decline, says UN
The world’s capacity to produce food is being undermined by humanity’s failure to protect biodiversity, according to the first UN study of the plants, animals and micro-organisms that help to put meals on our plates.

The stark warning was issued by the Food and Agriculture Organisation after scientists found evidence the natural support systems that underpin the human diet are deteriorating around the world as farms, cities and factories gobble up land and pump out chemicals.
 Organic carrot harvest in Germany. Organic agriculture makes up just 1% of global farmland. Photograph: Julian Stratenschulte/EPA

https://www.theguardian.com/global-development/2019/feb/21/worlds-food-supply-under-severe-threat-from-loss-of-biodiversity

Thursday, February 21, 2019

Greta Thunberg tells EU: your climate targets need doubling | Environment | The Guardian

A 16-years old Swedish school kid organizes school strikes and tells politicians and business leaders what to do about the Climate Crisis.
Check out this great video – and story – makes me feel hopeful:

Swede, 16, says EU cannot just ‘wait for us to grow up and become the ones in charge’

The EU should double its climate change reduction targets to do its fair share in keeping the planet below a dangerous level of global warming, the Swedish activist Greta Thunberg has told political and business leaders in Brussels.

Flanked by students from the Belgian and German school strike movements, the Swedish teenager said it was not enough to hope that young people were going to save the world.

Image result for Greta Thunberg addressed European Union leaders in Brussels
(The Associated Press) Swedish climate activist Greta Thunberg, center, speaks during an event at the EU Charlemagne building in Brussels, Thursday, Feb. 21, 2019.

Full story and video:

Greta Thunberg tells EU: your climate targets need doubling | Environment | The Guardian

Wednesday, February 20, 2019

Press release: Breakthrough for Indonesia's rainforests

After 9 years of support from Norway, deforestation in Indonesia has now begun to decline, and for the first time Indonesia can receive payments from Norway for reduced emissions from deforestation.



Photo: Rainforest Foundation Norway


Press release: Breakthrough for Indonesia's rainforests

Tonight Environmental Documentary Series on Climate Crisis

Environmental Documentary Series: Tonight - Anote’s Ark (Public Screening of yet unreleased award-winning film) and A Climate for Conflict. SHU, Science Building 131, 7pm

Tuesday, February 19, 2019

Fast fashion is harming the planet, MPs say - BBC News

Young people's love of fast fashion is coming under the scrutiny of Britain's law-makers.

MPs say the fashion industry is a major source of the greenhouse gases that are overheating the planet.

Discarded clothes are also piling up in landfill sites and fibre fragments are flowing into the sea when clothes are washed.

The retailers admit more needs to be done, but say they are already working to reduce the impact of their products.



ClothesImage copyrightGETTY IMAGES

Image captionDoes my environmental impact look big in this?


Fast fashion is harming the planet, MPs say - BBC News

Sunday, February 17, 2019

Your Pesticide Levels Can Drop Dramatically by Eating All Organic - Cornucopia Institute

 In a new study, 16 children and adults who ate only organic food for six days experienced a 60.5% reduction in the levels of common pesticides in their bodies.



Source: Larry Grubbs, Flickr






































Your Pesticide Levels Can Drop Dramatically by Eating All Organic - Cornucopia Institute



Open Access Science article: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0013935119300246

Weedkiller 'raises risk of non-Hodgkin lymphoma by 41%' | Business | The Guardian

A broad new scientific analysis of the cancer-causing potential of glyphosate herbicides, the most widely used weedkilling products in the world, has found that people with high exposures to the popular pesticides have a 41% increased risk of developing a type of cancer called non-Hodgkin lymphoma.



Bottles of Roundup herbicide, a product of Monsanto. Findings come as regulators in several countries consider limiting the use of glyphosate-based products in farming.



 Bottles of Roundup herbicide, a product of Monsanto. Findings come as regulators in several countries consider limiting the use of glyphosate-based products in farming. Photograph: Jeff Roberson/AP


Weedkiller 'raises risk of non-Hodgkin lymphoma by 41%' | Business | The Guardian

Open access science article: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1383574218300887

Friday, February 15, 2019

Climate risk missing in polar vortex reporting » Yale Climate Connections

Needed: Reporting on climate risks from polar vortex The late January deep freeze across much of the U.S. offers a valuable 'teachable moment' for media: Polar vortex heightens risks from climate change.



Americans watched toward the end of January as winter storm Jayden plunged much of the country (including parts of the Midwest where I live) to record-breaking low temperatures.

The extreme cold upended daily life, closed schools and universities, and disrupted mail service in 10 states and air travel around the country. Meanwhile, Australia experienced its hottest January on record.



NASA polar vortex image

NASA’s Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument captures a polar vortex moving from Central Canada into the U.S. Midwest from January 20 through January 29. (Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech AIRS Project)


Climate risk missing in polar vortex reporting » Yale Climate Connections

Sunday, February 10, 2019

Plummeting insect numbers 'threaten collapse of nature' | Environment | The Guardian

The world’s insects are hurtling down the path to extinction, threatening a “catastrophic collapse of nature’s ecosystems”, according to the first global scientific review.



More than 40% of insect species are declining and a third are endangered, the analysis found. The rate of extinction is eight times faster than that of mammals, birds and reptiles. The total mass of insects is falling by a precipitous 2.5% a year, according to the best data available, suggesting they could vanish within a century.







 The rate of insect extinction is eight times faster than that of mammals, birds and reptiles. Photograph: Courtesy of Entomologisher Verein Krefeld


Plummeting insect numbers 'threaten collapse of nature' | Environment | The Guardian

Adrian is Back on the Map to Monitor Air Pollution from Particulate Matter PM2.5

Adrian is back on the map to monitor air pollution from particulate matter PM2.5.
https://www.purpleair.com/map#7.19/42.453/-84.267






Monday, February 4, 2019

Animated Map: The Heartbeat of Nature's Productivity

Even the most ferocious predator must rely on simple plants for vitality. That’s because without the conversion of carbon dioxide to organic compounds, entire food chains would cease to exist.



Photosynthesis is quite the catalyst for life, yet it’s easy to overlook this humble chemical process. But what if you could see its results scaled across the globe?



THE PULSE OF NATURE



Nature's productivity static



Animated Map: The Heartbeat of Nature's Productivity

Wednesday, January 30, 2019

Fracking, "safe" setback distances around drilling sites and health risks in Allegheny County, Pennsylvania – SkyTruth

Fracking, "safe" setback distances around drilling sites and health risks
Mapping potential “drill out” scenarios in Allegheny County, Pennsylvania – SkyTruth





Mapping potential “drill out” scenarios in Allegheny County, Pennsylvani
Mapping potential “drill out” scenarios in Allegheny County, Pennsylvania – SkyTruth

10 Reasons to Feel Hopeful About Climate Change in 2019 | Sierra Club

In 2018, hurricanes, floods, fires, and droughts wreaked a level of destruction on the planet that, according to scientists, is just a taste of what is to come. In October, the International Panel on Climate Change issued a report stating that we have about 12 years to avoid catastrophic climate change. Meanwhile, global greenhouse gas emissions reached a record high in 2018. So is it still reasonable to hope that we can wean ourselves off fossil fuels in time to avert global calamity?

SUNRISE MOVEMENT PROTEST INSIDE THE OFFICE OF REPRESENTATIVE NANCY PELOSI | PHOTO BY MICHAEL BROCHSTEIN/SIPA USA (SIPA VIA AP IMAGES)
10 Reasons to Feel Hopeful About Climate Change in 2019 | Sierra Club

One Earth Climate Model | The Leonardo DiCaprio Foundation

A state-of-the-art climate model, funded by the Leonardo DiCaprio Foundation and released by the prestigious scientific publisher Springer Nature, offers a roadmap for meeting -- and surpassing -- the targets set by the 2016 Paris Climate Agreement, proving that we can solve the global climate crisis with currently available technologies. The book, entitled Achieving the Paris Climate Agreement, was the culmination of a two-year scientific collaboration with 17 leading scientists at the University of Technology Sydney (UTS), two institutes at the German Aerospace Center (DLR), and the University of Melbourne’s Climate & Energy College.




One Earth Climate Model | The Leonardo DiCaprio Foundation

Tuesday, January 29, 2019

Exclusive: Trump EPA won't limit 2 toxic chemicals in drinking water - POLITICO

The Trump administration will not set a drinking water limit for two toxic chemicals that are contaminating millions of Americans' tap water, two sources familiar with the forthcoming decision told POLITICO.



The EPA building
While EPA has decided against a drinking water limit, the draft chemical plan does include a decision to list those two chemicals as hazardous under the Superfund law.


Exclusive: Trump EPA won't limit 2 toxic chemicals in drinking water - POLITICO

Thursday, January 24, 2019

Wednesday, January 23, 2019

Reverse Osmosis Confirmed as Safe, Effective and Affordable Method to Filter out Cyanobacteria and the Microcystin Toxin

University of Toledo Professor and Chair of Chemical Engineering and Water Purification Expert G. Glenn Lipscomb confirms in an email to me sent today that good multi-stage Reverse Osmosis (RO) filter systems costing around $200 to install (often even less) and $60 per year for replacement filters are the method of choice to reliably clear Cyanobacteria and the microcystin toxin from your drinking water - and that the expensive NSF certified filters are NOT necessary. There is no excuse to resort to bottled water and contribute to the dangerous plastic pollution of our planet. Below is Prof. Lipscomb's email that I share with his permission.

Tom,

I am sorry to hear you are experiencing water quality problems. I know how frustrating and infuriating it can be.

I cannot guarantee the quality and efficacy of all RO systems that are available for point-of-use treatment at home. However, the ones we tested provided excellent removal of microcystin – to non-detectable levels.

We still are preparing the papers from the work. The thesis of the graduate student who performed the work, Neelam Jagani, is available here: https://etd.ohiolink.edu/pg_10?0::NO:10:P10_ACCESSION_NUM:toledo1524844338053604. I also attached a PDF copy.

Hope things improve soon,
Glenn

G. Glenn Lipscomb
Professor and Chair

Chemical Engineering
University of Toledo
3048 Nitschke Hall (MS 305)
1610 N Westwood Ave
Toledo, OH 43607

Tom Wassmer: I am more than happy to help Adrian residents and businesses with locating the right RO system free of charge.

Update, Good system at just $176:
https://www.abt.com/product/130329/APEC-Water-Essence-5-Stage-50-GPD-Reverse-Osmosis-Drinking-Water-System-ROES50.html

Toxic Secrets: The town that 3M built - where kids are dying of cancer

Katie Jurek was 19 years old when she was told the osteosarcoma, an aggressive form of bone cancer, had returned. She could amputate her leg or die within three months.



'Bombarded with it': Katelyn O'Connell is one of at least 21 Tartan High School students diagnosed with cancer during their primary, middle or high school years or within 10 years of graduating.
'Bombarded with it': Katelyn O'Connell is one of at least 21 Tartan High School students diagnosed with cancer during their primary, middle or high school years or within 10 years of graduating.CREDIT:DAVID BOWMAN



Toxic Secrets: The town that 3M built - where kids are dying of cancer

Tuesday, January 22, 2019

Certain Dental Flosses Raise Body Levels of Toxic Chemicals

Flossing teeth could increase the body's levels of per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) — widely used chemicals linked to a number of diseases and certain cancers — warn US researchers.
Changing daily behaviors could reduce exposure, they say.


Certain Dental Flosses Raise Body Levels of Toxic Chemicals

The battle on the frontline of climate change in Mali - BBC News

Everything about Mami exudes exhaustion. Her round brown eyes are pools of sadness, and her bulbous body throbs with pain.



"First, armed groups attacked nearby," she explains in a tired voice as we sit on plastic matting, five young children nestled close to their mother in Mali's fabled city in the sand Timbuktu.



"Then the rains came, and did the rest."



The worst rains in 50 years in northern Mali washed away their entire crop.



Those rains poured through the cracks in her mud home caused by an explosion an armed group set off.



Sunset

Mali is lurching between drought and flood



The battle on the frontline of climate change in Mali - BBC News

Friday, January 18, 2019

Reverse Osmosis - Affordable Solution for Adrian's Water Issues

The current water situation should be another reason for restaurants, bars, coffee shops and other food related businesses and affluent residents to invest in an under the sink Revers Osmosis System. It also provides peace of mind about hexavalent chromium, lead, chlorine and chlorine organics products in chlorinated water, and many other pollutants that could occur.
RO systems can be purchased from many places at bargain rates of $100 to everyday rates of $250. Filters need to be replaced every year for about $60. Compare this to the price for 1 year of unregulated bottle water producing plastic waste polluting the environment.. No brainier and no excuses!

The link below supports RO as a solution during the Toledo water crisis:

https://www.toledoblade.com/local/2016/08/29/Reverse-osmosis-seen-as-solution-for-toxin.html

A good source for an RO system is:

https://www.uswatersystems.com/

Immediate fossil fuel phaseout could arrest climate change – study | Environment | The Guardian

Scientists say it may still technically be possible to limit warming to 1.5C if drastic action is taken now



wind turbines and solar farm|
 The study found there is a 66% chance of staying below 1.5C above pre-industrial levels if immediate action is taken. Photograph: Alamy



Immediate fossil fuel phaseout could arrest climate change – study | Environment | The Guardian

BBC News: Australia swelters through record-breaking heatwave

The country has just experienced five of its 10 warmest days on record, meteorologists say

Thursday, January 17, 2019

Insect collapse: ‘We are destroying our life support systems’ | Environment | The Guardian

Scientist Brad Lister returned to Puerto Rican rainforest after 35 years to find 98% of ground insects had vanished



El Yunque national forest in Sierra de Luquillo, Puerto Rico


 El Yunque national forest in Sierra de Luquillo, Puerto Rico. Photograph: Stuart Westmorland/Corbis/Getty Images


Insect collapse: ‘We are destroying our life support systems’ | Environment | The Guardian