Wednesday, November 14, 2018

The many ways climate change worsens California wildfires » Yale Climate Connections

The many ways climate change worsens California wildfires

by Dana Nuccitelli



Years of record-setting California wildfires are consistent with mounting evidence of climate change as a principal factor.



NASA photo

Now designated as California’s deadliest fire, the still-raging Camp Fire by November 13 had led to 42 deaths, with many residents still unaccounted for and more than 7,000 structures destroyed. (Image credit: NASA)

The many ways climate change worsens California wildfires » Yale Climate Connections

Wednesday, November 7, 2018

Opinion | We Have to Save the Planet. So I’m Donating $1 Billion. - The New York Times

If more billionaires are following we might have a chance?



Tourists in Argentina viewed the Perito Moreno Glacier in Los Glaciares National Park in March.CreditCreditWalter Diaz/Agence France-Presse — Getty Images


Opinion | We Have to Save the Planet. So I’m Donating $1 Billion. - The New York Times

Friday, November 2, 2018

Mapped: nitrogen dioxide pollution around the world - Unearthed

In the last few years, governments and corporations around the world have come under increasing pressure to act on a global air pollution crisis.
In Europe, nitrogen dioxide (NO2) has been at the centre of the debate, following the dieselgate scandal and numerous legal battles faced by governments that have been shown to be in breach of legal limits.

As the World Health Organisation hosts its first global air pollution conference, new satellite data reveals the scale and spread of global NO2 on an unprecedented scale, from lignite power plants in Europe to wildfires in Africa.
Mapped against known pollution sources, it shows that NO2 pollution doesn’t come from diesel pollution alone; it is also emitted by coal, oil, gas and biomass plants as well as forest fires and crop burning.


Mapped: nitrogen dioxide pollution around the world - Unearthed

This Electric Airplane Could Revolutionize How We Fly

The airplane industry generates about 12% of all transportation-related carbon emissions in the US according to the EPA. In fact, the single best way to reduce your personal carbon footprint is to fly less often and outset your flights. One round-trip flight from New York to California generates 20% of the greenhouse gases that a car produces in over a year.



This Electric Airplane Could Revolutionize How We Fly

EasyJet plans electric planes by 2030 | CNN Travel

(CNN) — Passengers concerned about the impact of air travel on the environment could soon opt for a cleaner alternative.

EasyJet, the British-based budget airline, has pledged to develop a fleet of electric planes to cover short-haul routes by 2030, which would effectively reduce carbon emissions and noise from its operations.

The no-frills carrier is in partnership with US-based manufacturer Wright Electric to build battery-propelled jets for flights of less than two hours.

Founded in 2016, Wright Electric already has a two-seater electric plane and plans to begin flying a nine-seater next year. It has now applied for a patent on a motor for an electric airliner.



A model of how the future electric plane is expected to look.



EasyJet plans electric planes by 2030 | CNN Travel

Thursday, November 1, 2018

Startling new research finds large buildup of heat in the oceans, suggesting a faster rate of global warming - The Washington Post

Less time - this is not good news as humanity is usually slow and unwilling to adapt to the inconvenient truth - unless it is not possible to ignore it anymore.
Any further delays in effective greenhouse gas reduction by phasing out fossil fuels, restoring forests and wetlands, switching to diversified ecological agriculture, reducing meat consumption, and a more humble lifestyle, would be the devastating as the temperature will rise higher than 1.5C globally with dire effects on catastrophic weather events, heat, flooding, drought and diseases - and it will take hundreds of years to reverse...


oceansImage copyrightGETTY IMAGES



Image captionThe new study says the oceans have absorbed far more heat than previously thought


The world’s oceans have been soaking up far more excess heat in recent decades than scientists realized, suggesting that Earth could be set to warm even faster than predicted in the years ahead, according to new research published Wednesday.
Over the past quarter-century, Earth’s oceans have retained 60 percent more heat each year than scientists previously had thought, said Laure Resplandy, a geoscientist at Princeton University who led the startling study published Wednesday in the journal Nature. The difference represents an enormous amount of additional energy, originating from the sun and trapped by Earth’s atmosphere — the yearly amount representing more than eight times the world’s annual energy consumption.


Startling new research finds large buildup of heat in the oceans, suggesting a faster rate of global warming - The Washington Post